‘Cooperators’ pub manager accused of using company credit card to buy beer

The owner of a Cooperators pub in Queensland has been charged with using his own company credit to buy beers.

The manager of a nearby Cooperators bar has also been charged over a similar scheme.

The arrests were made on Wednesday and Thursday.

It’s understood the manager of the neighbouring pub, James Farrar, also pleaded not guilty.

Farrars lawyer, Michael Wollam, told the ABC he was not aware of any other charges against the barman.

He said he had been in touch with police and the alleged offences had been investigated by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission.

He described the alleged scheme as a case of fraud and said it was unlikely to be sustained.

Mr Wollom said he was confident of a conviction on all charges.

“It’s a very serious matter and it will be prosecuted in the highest court in Australia,” he said.

He told the Australian Financial Press that he had spoken to the Bar Council of Queensland and the NSW Bar Association.

“I think it’s a disgrace that someone would do something like this,” Mr Wotllam said.

The Bar Council said it had been approached by Mr Wottam, who had applied for an extension on his licence.

He was previously given an extension to renew his licence in February.

Bar Council Queensland director of legal services, James Wollamy, said there was a significant risk of a breach of the Act.

“There are a number of ways in which the scheme could have occurred, particularly if a bar owner is in a position where he or she has been able to access credit from other organisations, including credit unions,” Mr Woolamy said.

Mr Woolam said that in the case of the Cooperators, there was no indication that the credit card company had been charged for the credit cards used.

“This is a very complicated issue, and one that has a significant impact on the integrity of the financial system,” he added.

Mr Woolman said there had been an extensive investigation by the Bar of Queensland into the alleged activities of Mr Wettar and Mr Wopar, who was previously charged with failing to maintain a safe and sound banking system. “

That means ensuring that it’s conducted in a way that’s minimising the risk of fraud.”

Mr Woolman said there had been an extensive investigation by the Bar of Queensland into the alleged activities of Mr Wettar and Mr Wopar, who was previously charged with failing to maintain a safe and sound banking system.

“They’ve been working with the Bar for a number years and there’s been a significant amount of work done in relation to this,” he told the AP.

“The Bar of Brisbane has been conducting an extensive review of the scheme, and there are a significant number of matters they’ve undertaken, including an extensive assessment of whether the scheme has been authorised and if so, whether any breaches have occurred.”

He said it would be inappropriate for the Bar to comment further at this stage.

Mr Farrs lawyer, Paul O’Connor, told AAP that there was little doubt Mr Fars scheme had been a fraud.

“As a bar, we do a lot of things that we believe are appropriate,” he explained.

Mr O’Connors lawyer said the Bar was not involved in any aspect of the investigation. “

However, there is no requirement that bar staff should always be in compliance with all the rules and regulations of the bar.”

Mr O’Connors lawyer said the Bar was not involved in any aspect of the investigation.

“Any investigation is done in the interest of the public,” he noted.

Mr OConnor said that the charges would not affect the operation of the Bar.

“He is not a member of the management team.

He is not employed by the bar,” he argued.

“His role as the bar manager is to manage and supervise all of the other staff and his role as a bar manager has been totally and entirely in the best interests of the people of the city of Bendigo.”

Mr Far’s lawyer said he did not believe that the Bar had breached the Australian Consumer Law by failing to enforce the code of practice for the bar.

“People would expect the bar to pay their bills.” “

What they’re going for is to spend money,” he continued.

“People would expect the bar to pay their bills.”

Mr Wllam has told the Bar that he was hopeful of a successful prosecution.

“Mr Wottar’s alleged actions are wholly unacceptable and the Bar is committed to upholding the law,” he had said.

“In this instance, the Bar will be pursuing all available legal avenues to bring this matter to a conclusion.”

Mr Cowan said the investigation into the scheme had revealed a “serious breach” of the law.

“At the end of the day, the bar is not going down with this,” she said.

She said the charges brought against Mr Wortar and Farr were “sad” and the bar